Before and after perspectives.

The project was based on a real life failing quarter in Sheffield (CIQ) which is dominated by carparks and industrial buildings. These are before and after pictures of final outcome I did.

3rd before image by Amy Miller.

Copyright protected by Rodas Bisrat. University of Sheffield. Landscape Architecture.

7 months ago
10 notes
thisbigcity:

Increasing population coupled with high rates of urbanization has resulted in a solid waste management crisis. Yet despite shared challenges, the approach to waste management differs in the global north and global south. 

thisbigcity:

Increasing population coupled with high rates of urbanization has resulted in a solid waste management crisis. Yet despite shared challenges, the approach to waste management differs in the global north and global south

7 months ago
63 notes
thisbigcity:

Every week, the city turns 120km of roads into car-free spaces, and around 2 million people take part. 
Have your own #citydata you’d like to share?  Send it our way! 

thisbigcity:

Every week, the city turns 120km of roads into car-free spaces, and around 2 million people take part

Have your own #citydata you’d like to share?  Send it our way

7 months ago
86 notes

ryanpanos:

San Francisco’s Salt Flat | Charles Benton | Via

The southern end of the San Francisco Bay Area is known for expensive real estate, tech companies, and aerospace engineers. Less well known is its salt content.

Yet the salt industry has been a vital part of the South Bay for more than a century. Fly into any of the region’s airports and evidence of this appears as a vibrant quilt of briny pools in acid green, ochre, and shades of red that look toxic. These algae-infused intake and evaporation ponds, crisscrossed by channels and levees, are a surreal landscape seen best from the air.

Photographer Cris Benton has studied and documented this fascinating area for over 10 years, using cameras held aloft by large handmade kites. In his new book, Saltscapes: The Kite Aerial Photography of Cris Benton (Heyday Press), the retired architecture professor explains that kite aerial photography “fuels my fascination with photography’s capacity to reveal patterns and phenomena that lie beyond the capacities of our native senses.”

(via plotscape)

7 months ago
796 notes

On 21 March we had an exhibition showcasing our ideas for a failed quarter in Sheffield called Cultural Industries Quarter. The area is an area in the city centre with many art studios, industrial buildings, a technology school and Hallam University buildings and accommodation. It is a failing quarter because there are many closed (or appearing closed) industrial buildings which have little use.

Our vision stemmed from the Japanese act of repairing broken ceramics with gold lacquer (Kintsugi) to give it use again and to make it stronger and more beautiful. We felt the CIQ needed that ‘umph’ to become stronger and more beautiful. We decided to use this as a design language with the idea of broken cracks being the form that gathering or resting areas took (see model). We decided one element that could attract users from residential and market areas was by stripping down the dark tarmac to reveal historic layers of cobbles and brick. We will then ‘fill’ it with materials that have a gold look or vegetation in some areas to lead people into the CIQ and into several nodes along the trail.

The exhibition held around 10-13 work and I was glad that our group was nominated for the Rosie Reynolds award. Rosie Reynolds also took this module previously but unfortunately she passed away from cancer. And because the company she worked for liked her so much and she enjoyed the module they decided to host this award in her name. The prize includes 250 British Pounds and 6 bottles of wine because she loved to be social and loved to drink. 

Overall it was a successful exhibition with quite a few people turning out. I even got to meet an artist who used to have a studio in the CIQ and was glad to hear from her that she liked our idea.

7 months ago
2 notes
studiobarber:

moms are lovely

Fact: 19000 cyclists in the UK are killed, seriously injured or slightly injured a year. - Royal Society for the prevention of Accidents

studiobarber:

moms are lovely

Fact: 19000 cyclists in the UK are killed, seriously injured or slightly injured a year. - Royal Society for the prevention of Accidents

7 months ago
9 notes
cjwho:

converse vs asics by Ronnie Yip
Toronto (/tɵˈrɒntoʊ/, locally /ˈtrɒnoʊ/) is the largest city in Canada and the provincial capital of Ontario. It is located in Southern Ontario on the northwestern shore of Lake Ontario. The history of Toronto began in the late 18th century when the British Crown purchased its land from the Mississaugas of the New Credit. The British established a settlement there, called the Town of York, which its lieutenant governor, John Graves Simcoe, designated as the capital of Upper Canada. The city was ransacked in the Battle of York during the War of 1812. In 1834, York was incorporated as a city and renamed Toronto. It was damaged in two huge fires, in 1849 and 1904. Over the years, Toronto has several times expanded its borders through amalgamation with surrounding municipalities, most recently in 1998.
CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe

cjwho:

converse vs asics by Ronnie Yip

Toronto (/tɵˈrɒntoʊ/, locally /ˈtrɒnoʊ/) is the largest city in Canada and the provincial capital of Ontario. It is located in Southern Ontario on the northwestern shore of Lake Ontario. The history of Toronto began in the late 18th century when the British Crown purchased its land from the Mississaugas of the New Credit. The British established a settlement there, called the Town of York, which its lieutenant governor, John Graves Simcoe, designated as the capital of Upper Canada. The city was ransacked in the Battle of York during the War of 1812. In 1834, York was incorporated as a city and renamed Toronto. It was damaged in two huge fires, in 1849 and 1904. Over the years, Toronto has several times expanded its borders through amalgamation with surrounding municipalities, most recently in 1998.

CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe

7 months ago
731 notes

terfigyelo:

Reflected grees landscape by Alyson Shotz

at Storm King Arts Center 2010-12

photo by Jeremy l. Thompson

7 months ago
249 notes
Peace Gardens, Sheffield.

Peace Gardens, Sheffield.

7 months ago
1 note

secretrepublic:

Copenhagen Redesigns City for Stormwater Management (and then some)


A month before I arrived in Copenhagen in the summer of 2011, I watched  news footage of the worst flood the city had seen since at least 1955 (when systematic flood measurements began). It cost the city over $1 billion USD.

The same year, Copenhagen failed to earn the European Green Capital award despite pristine performance across the board of sustainability indicators except one; public green space. 

Copenhagen is now rolling out a new plan to address its challenges of both stormwater management and insufficient green space. 

Note: Darth Vader on a Segway in the last image. Well played, municipal architects.

(via 33ale88)

7 months ago
334 notes